top of page

The CCWTP Upgrades Project is a once-in-a-lifetime project that will maintain our access to this
high-quality, delicious drinking water supply for
the next 50+ years.

What is the City Creek Water Treatment Plant (CCWTP)?

The City Creek Water Treatment Plant (CCWTP) is located approximately three miles from the canyon entrance on Bonneville Boulevard. City Creek Canyon is a protected watershed above the water treatment facility and designated as the City Creek Nature Preserve.

City Creek is the ancestral home of Indigenous Peoples including the Shoshone People and Ute American Indians. CCWTP was the first municipal water treatment plant built in the State of Utah. Originally designed in 1953 and brought online in 1955, the plant has been an integral component of SLCDPU’s drinking water supply for over 65 years.

Aging infrastructure has resulted in several structural and mechanical deficiencies that must be addressed to restore the resiliency and reliability needed for this critical water supply.

History of City Creek Timeline showing that City Creek was the first water source diverted for use after settlement by Mormon Pioneers in 1847 and is now (as of 2020) to be rebuilt in phases based on the condition assessment of all facilities.

City Creek Canyon:

Early History

 

Learn more about City Creek Canyon's early uses, challenges, and developments by exploring the articles linked below. 

IMG_0488.JPG
DSC_7631.JPG

City Creek Canyon collects water from 19.2 square miles of watershed that feed the 14.5 mile-long City Creek stream. 

Treatment Plant Upgrades

Due to aging infrastructure and mechanical inefficiencies, the City Creek Water Treatment Plant (CCWTP) requires facility and process upgrades to increase the efficiency, resiliency, and reliability of the water treatment plant.

The CCWTP Upgrades Project is a once-in-a-lifetime project that will maintain our access to this high-quality, delicious drinking water supply for the next 50+ years.

Based on the criticality and needs for these improvements, FEMA has awarded Salt Lake City with a $36.7 million grant to help construct these upgrades.

What's New?

Canyon access is currently limited to ensure that the CCWTP Upgrades project maintains safety as a top priority. Hazards such as debris, narrow pathways, gravel roads, and heavy equipment traveling through the canyon pose safety concerns for canyon visitors during active construction. Access updates are distributed through text and email communication to those who opt-in to receive notifications.

More information can be found on the CONSTRUCTION and ENGAGEMENT tabs above.

In the News

bottom of page